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Trillium to focus on alcohol abuse

Today is National Alcohol Screening Day and Trillium Health Resources is using the opportunity to highlight its Access Point program, which provides anonymous, self-conducted screenings for a number of mental health issues including alcohol-use disorder. “The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence have designated April as Alcohol Awareness Month. During this month, Trillium Health Resources joins these organizations to promote awareness of https://www.gov.uk/government/policies/mental-health-service-reform the signs for alcohol use disorder,” a press release from the organization stated. Trillium Health Resources is Nash County’s specialty care manager for individuals with substance use disorders, mental illness and intellectual/developmental disabilities. Alcohol-abuse disorder is one of the most significant public health issues in the United States, the press release said. According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, an estimated 16.6 million Americans have alcohol-abuse disorder but only about 8 percent of those people have sought treatment.  Warning signs of alcohol use disorder include: ■ continued use of alcohol even when it causes problems ■ consumption of a larger amount of drinks in order to achieve a previous effect ■ withdrawal symptoms from a rapid decrease in or abstinence from drinking ■ reduction in social and work activities and loss of interest in hobbies ■ failure to fulfill major obligations at work, school or home due to repeated alcohol us ■ unsuccessful attempts at cutting back drinking even when trying. “If you or someone you love is exhibiting one or more of these symptoms, it is important to seek help,” said Antoinette Barnhill, communications coordinator for Trillium Health Resources. Barnhill said residents of Nash County can use the Access Point program to self-screen for alcohol-use disorder and other issues. The portal can be found at  http://trilliumncaccesspoint.org/ “Trillium will be conducting a Facebook Live feed in the afternoon on Thursday in order to highlight the Access Point screening tool for Alcohol Screening Day. We will be focusing on the online portal as this is the method which is available to all members,” Barnhill told the Telegram. Two Rocky Mount-based Trillium providers offer help for residents with alcohol-use disorders. Macta, at 209 North Pearl St., has a crisis phone line at 252-458-6770. Starting Pointe at 301 South Church S., Suite 140, has a crisis phone number of 252-443-6653. Other Trillium providers can be found at https://www.trilliumhealthresources.org/for-providers/provider-directory “Our provider directory is a highly dynamic database, so we encourage all members and stakeholders to contact the call center in order to receive the most up-to-date information regarding providers in their area for their needs,” Barnhill said. Trillium has its own 24-Hour Access to Care Line number, 1-877-685-2415, for Nash County residents in need of help. That number is 1-877-685-2415

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SMART Recovery Training “Get SMART FAST” Training Program Launches New Website During the six years since the launch of our online “Get SMART FAST” training program in September 2011, interest in SMART Recovery and the participation in our training program has experienced significant growth. As a result, we “outgrew” our previous website and training platform. In December, our new “Get SMART FAST” training program Online Learning Center website at https:// smartrecoverytraining.org/ was launched, bringing with it a new “tiered” training program and course offerings. Our “Get SMART FAST” (Facilitator And Support Team) Training Program courses have been designed to provide you with the necessary knowledge of SMART Recovery and its 4-Point Program for you to proceed capably and comfortably in your role as a SMART Recovery volunteer… no matter what that “role” might be!  No matter which SMART Recovery volunteer role it is that you wish to pursue, we’re here to work with you and provide you the training to make it happen! There are currently two “tiers” in place, with additional tiers and course offerings being planned and developed: TIER 1: Get SMART FAST Host & Advanced Host Training Each of the Tier 1 training courses are tailored to the specific situation and your desired entry-level volunteer role, providing you with the needed knowledge and resources to proceed comfortably and capably in your meeting host, co-host, or in a SMART Recovery Online (SROL) message board, chat, or online Meeting Helper volunteer role: Upon completing this training course, you’ll be authorized to Host or Co-Host an existing SMART Recovery meeting (under the guidance and supervision of the meeting Facilitator) using the provided discussion meeting format. SMART Recovery discussion meetings are designed to support individuals in their journey to overcome an addiction and provide a platform for lively and helpful group discussions. When completing this advanced host training, you’ll be authorized to start and host a NEW SMART Recovery discussion meeting in your area, or become a SMART Recovery Online (SROL) online meeting helper, message board, or chat volunteer. During this training, you’ll gain the needed skills to recognize and ask for topics to discuss, be able to identify and apply a SMART tool relevant to the topic, and provide questions based on the SMART Recovery tools. You’ll also be provided with information for getting a new SMART Recovery discussion meeting started and underway. As you become comfortable in your new meeting host or other volunteer role, you may desire to become more involved in helping others. When that time comes, we encourage you to move up to the next level (tier) and complete the Facilitator training course on Tier 2. In doing so, you’ll obtain a deeper knowledge and stronger understanding of the SMART Recovery program and the application of the SMART tools. You’ll also gain additional meeting management skills and strengths to proceed capably in the advanced role of a SMART Recovery Facilitator. TIER 2: Get SMART FAST Facilitator Training Our most popular training, the Facilitator training course provides you with an in-depth, comprehensive training on the SMART Recovery 4-Point Program, the SMART Recovery tools… and MORE! Our Facilitator training course is designed to provide you with the necessary knowledge of SMART Recovery and its 4-Point Program for you to proceed capably, comfortably (and authoritatively) in your role as a SMART Recovery meeting Facilitator. It is a requirement of all our meeting Facilitators– whether face-to-face or online—to complete this training program course, where you’ll review the various video presentations, reading materials, videos, and complete segment training exercises and quizzes. All of the training materials are provided online within the training course, requiring no additional purchase of course materials. Being an “add-on” module to the Facilitator training, this additional training is for meeting Facilitators who desire to provide a support group for those individuals having a loved one with an addictive behavior. Upon completing this additional “add-on” module to the required Facilitator training course, you’ll be able to provide a Family & Friends meeting to address the specific issues encountered when a family member or friend tries to reach out and help a loved one affected by addiction. Come and learn with us! You can make a difference and touch the lives of many people in your community by expanding the reach of SMART Recovery to your area.

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Jamie Biswas, Chief of NIDA’s Medications Research Grants Branch , says that both studies highlight the importance of genetic factors in determining the outcomes of treatments for substance abuse: “The findings could help explain why some people respond well to treatment while others do not. They could provide a rationale in clinical trials of substance abuse treatments for dividing subjects into groups based on the subjects’ genetic variants.” Dr. Jonathan M. Davis, lead investigator of the Tufts study, explains, “The incidence and severity of NAS symptoms vary widely among newborns and are not always related https://www.mass.gov/orgs/massachusetts-department-of-mental-health to the type and amount of drugs their mothers use.” If genetic variations can reliably predict whether an infant will have NAS, and its severity, then clinicians can use genetic testing to prepare appropriate treatment for opioid-exposed newborns. It might also inform adjustments in the treatment of expectant mothers’ opioid addiction to reduce the potential for severe NAS. Dr. Biswas notes that the large population size in the study by Dr. Clarke and colleagues adds to the reliability of its findings, whereas the smaller size of the NAS study by Dr. Wachman makes its findings only preliminary. Even though it is too early to tell whether these findings can be applied to clinical trials and practice, “the study of the role of genetics in treating diseases is valid and highly promising. It is also being pursued for many other health and disease indications—such as cancer, heart disease, and opportunistic infections.” The studies were supported by NIH grants DA025995, DA025201, DA05186, DA032776, and DA012756 (Clarke and colleagues), and DA024806 and DA032889 (Wachman and colleagues). Clarke, T.-K., et al. Low frequency genetic variants in the μ-opioid receptor (OPRM1) affect risk for addiction to heroin and cocaine.

https://www.drugabuse.gov/news-events/nida-notes/2014/06/gene-variants-reduce-opioid-risks